Encyclopaedic Survey of Evolution of Culture

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ISBN : 9788130716718

 

Volumes : Set in 2 Volumes

 

Author : By Julius Lippert Translated & Edited by George Peter Murdock

 

Pages : 788 pp

 

Year of Publishing : 2015

 

Binding : Hardbound

 

Publisher : Cosmo Publications

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“Comte, Spencer, Bastian and Lippert are the leaders in sociology. What others have done is of secondary importance.”

This is the judgment of Gumplowicz, himself one of the greatest of all sociologists. And that Julius Lippert should be ranked as one of the foremost sociologists of all time will surprise only those who are unacquainted with his work. His writings may be read by social scientists, not only with historical interest, but with much positive profit. Their enduring value and influence have abundantly justifies Gumplowicz’s high opinion. Part and parcel or Lippert’s inductive approach is his use of the comparative ethno-graphic method, which aligns him with Spencer, Tylor, Frazer, Westermarck, Briffault, and Sumner, and to a greater or lesser extent with the various contemporary American exponents of a cultural approach to sociology, like Chapin, Keller, Wallis, Webster, and Willey. This method has the advantage of covering “by far the longest stretch of societal evolution.” It gives a view of society which is vertical rather than horizontal, evolutionary rather than descriptive, dynamic rather than static. It promotes objectivity, scientific detachment, and comparative insulation from “the inevitable and ineradictable bias with which we all view that which, since we live in the midst of it, touches us immediately.” The neglect of such objective methods is in large measure responsible for the realization, “wishful thinking,” and utopianism which characterize so much of sociological literature.

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